Thursday, April 29, 2010

Jamrag by John Lennon – *

First released: 1972

Another one of those crazy non-tunes that John and Yoko performed with Frank Zappa that appeared on the original LP and CD albums of "Some Time in New York City", but were edited off of the CD reissue.

Jamming With Heather by Paul McCartney – *

Unreleased.

The Beatles really messing about with Paul's adopted daughter Heather in 1969. Nothing much and as such should remain unreleased.

"James Paul McCartney" (feature) by Paul McCartney – ***

First released: 1973

Although never officially released onto video, this did air on television in the UK in 1973 and the US in 1976. It’s kind of a crazy mix of songs, due mainly to its being filmed before the mid-70s classic "Band On the Run", so none of those songs appear here. And since, McCartney really didn’t want to perform Beatles stuff (save for a nod to "Yesterday"), one is left with his strange output from 1970 to early 1973. Highlights (and best songs) include his performances of "Maybe I’m Amazed", "Uncle Albert" and "Live and Let Die". Also included are performances of "Mary Had a Little Lamb", "My Love" and "Heart of the Country". A highlight (some say lowlight) is the performance of the still unreleased "Gotta Sing, Gotta Dance".

James Coburn (dialogue) by James Coburn – ***

First released: 1998

James Coburn discusses his participation in the photoshoot for "Band on the Run" on the "25th Anniversary Edition".

Jambalaya by The Beatles – (NR)

Unreleased.

The Beatles ran through a version of this classic when working with Tony Sheridan in 1961.

Jam by The Beatles – (NR)

Unreleased.

Name for unreleased Lennon/Harrison/Starkey improvisation dating from 1968.

Jacob’s Ladder by Doris Troy – ***

First released: 1969

Doris Troy song and single released with the production and playing help of George.

J.J. by John Lennon – (NR)

Unreleased.

Unreleased Lennon demo dating from 1971.

It’s What You Value by George Harrison – ****

First released: 1976

For those wondering if George Harrison can write an upbeat funky tune look no further than this track. Buried on the highly abundant but somewhat ignored "33 1/3" album, this was the result of many years of lackluster tunes coming from the mind of Harrison. The track was released as a single, to little fanfare, in England. This should have been released as a single in the US as well.

It’s the Same Old Song by The Beatles – ***

First released: 1965

Lennon starts singing this on "The Beatles’ Third Christmas Record" in 1965 before the others shut him up for copyright infringement. It’s also on "The Beatles Christmas Album" from 1970. The Four Tops recorded the popular version earlier in the year.

It’s So Hard by John Lennon – ****

First released: 1971

The b-side of the "Imagine" single and also an album track from Lennon’s "Imagine". Just another great tune. It’s also on 1990’s "Lennon". Lennon also performed this live in 1972 and this version was released in 1986 on "Live in New York City". This version was also on "Instant Karma" from 2001. A different live version appears on 1998’s "The John Lennon Anthology".

It’s Real by John Lennon – ***

First released: 1998

A instrumental that wasn’t officially released until 1998’s "The John Lennon Anthology" and later on 2004’s "Acoustic".

It’s Only Love by The Beatles – ***

First released: 1965

A sweet song sung very well by Lennon from the non-soundtrack side of the UK "Help!" A demo version appears on "Anthology 2" in 1996.

It’s Now or Never by Paul McCartney – ***

First released: 1990

This was recorded at the same sessions that created the "Choba B CCCP" album, but was left off in favor of inclusion in "The Last Temptation of Elvis" tribute album. It's a good version by Paul and it's too bad it's kind of now hard to find.

Wednesday, April 28, 2010

It’s Not True by Paul McCartney – ***

First released: 1986

Commanding song that actually starts off pretty well and then peters on for over five minutes with Paul kind of making up lyrics as he goes along. Could have used considerable shortening to be a more effective piece. One of the original bonus tracks on the "Press to Play" CD.

It’s No Secret by Ringo Starr – **

First released: 1977

Another clunker from "Ringo the 4th".

It’s Love by Ringo Starr – ***

First released: 2008

I hate stuff like this! This is a download only tune that should have been on Ringo’s "Liverpool 8". At the very least, it should have been a b-side or on the USB wristband version of the album. Sucks. And it turns out it is better than most of the songs that did appear on that album. Also, it really is a different song, even though it was rumored to be just a working title of "If It’s Love That You Want" that did appear on "Liverpool 8".

It’s Johnny’s Birthday by George Harrison – ***

First released: 1970

A much needed dose of humor in the midst of the "Apple Jam" disc of "All Things Must Pass". I’m not a big fan of that third disc and I would have rather seen this silly throwaway tribute to John Lennon’s 30th birthday sung to the tune of "Congratulations" as the album closer.

It’s For You by The Beatles – ***

Unreleased.

Lennon/McCartney song given to Cilla Black in 1964. It is unknown whether there is a Beatles version. I haven't heard it.

"It’s Alright" by Yoko Ono – ***

First released: 1982

Second post-Lennon Yoko Ono solo album features a ghostly figure of Lennon on the back cover and a snippet of him screaming “Yoko” from "The Wedding Album" on the track "Never Say Goodbye".

It’s All Too Much by The Beatles – **

First released: 1968

Never before has a song lived up to its title. I've never been fond of this track by George that was certainly a throwaway by The Beatles, as they donated it to the "Yellow Submarine" movie project. It appears with a slightly different lyric in the movie than it does on the soundtrack or 1999's "Yellow Submarine Songtrack".

It’s All Down to Goodnight Vienna by Ringo Starr – ****

First released: 1974

The title track from Ringo’s fairly successful "Goodnight Vienna" album, written by John Lennon. It is one of my favorite Ringo songs and pretty much my favorite Beatles songs of all time. There are actually three versions of this song. The first is the album opener. The song, bearing the legend “reprise” appears at the end of the album. A third version, now considerably rarer, and not available on CD until 2007’s "Photograph" compilation is the 45 single version that was released in 1975. This version tacked the reprise onto the opening version creating a “new” version.

It Won’t Be Long by The Beatles – ****

First released: 1963

The best part about this tune is the alternating “Yeah, yeah” vocals. It’s a good album opener from "With The Beatles".

It Takes a Lot to Laugh, It Takes a Train to Cry by Bob Dylan – ***

First released: 1971

Bob Dylan continues delighting the fans (not me, though), at "The Concert for Bangla Desh", with this track from his "Highway 61 Revisited" album from 1965. Leon Russell covered this and plays on this live track as well.

It is ‘He’ (Jai Sri Krishna) by George Harrison – ***

First released: 1974

George’s voice actually sounds a little bit better on this "Dark Horse" album track. Perhaps he was happy about the subject matter he was singing about in a much more blatant way that he had previously. It’s really not too bad in comparison to the rest of the album.

It Happened by Yoko Ono – ***

First released: 1981

B-side to the infamous "Walking on Thin Ice". Originally recorded in 1973 by Yoko One, it was resurrected for this b-side release and somewhat appropriate for the horrible 1980 events.

It Don’t Come Easy by Ringo Starr – ****

First released: 1971

Poor Ringo was never considered to release anything that amounted to anything after The Beatles and proved it by releasing an album of standards and a country album before this. Fortunately, this (and a number of other songs) hit, and Ringo was able to turn it into a latter-day touring career. This is a staple of his live repertoire. The first time he performed it live was in "The Concert For Bangla Desh", where he famously forgot the lyrics! But it was Ringo, and he was playing with George again after the breakup, LIVE, so all was/is forgiven. Besides, there are many fine examples of Ringo’s live version on subsequent albums including 1990’s "Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band" (this version reissued on 2000’s "The Anthology…So Far"), "Ringo Starr and His Third All-Starr Band Volume 1" from 1997, 1998’s "VH1 Storytellers", 2003’s "Extended Versions", and 2004’s "Tour 2003". If you don’t like this tune, you don’t like Ringo. It was also issued as a bonus track on the 1991 CD issue of Ringo, Ringo’s "Blast From Your Past" compilation in 1975 and 2007’s "Photograph" compilation. Though George doesn’t get composing credit, there is an unreleased solo demo version by George that makes the “Hare Krishna” references more prominent. It’s a good version as well, and hopefully Olivia Harrison will see fit to officially release it someday. Ringo also sung it as a medley with "With a Little Help From My Friends" on "Live at Soundstage" in 2007. It is also on the "Live 2006" album from 2008 bearing the title "Introduction".

Isolation by John Lennon – ****

First released: 1970

Lennon really pounds the keys on this harder thumper from "John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band". Just simply a great tune. It’s also on 1990’s "Lennon" and "Working Class Hero" from 2005. A demo version appears on 1998’s "The John Lennon Anthology" and 2006’s "Remember".

Tuesday, April 27, 2010

Isn’t It a Pity by George Harrison – ***

First released: 1970

Readers already know I am not a huge fan of "All Things Must Pass". Here is another reason: two versions of this song. While the song is pleasant, it certainly isn’t good enough to warrant two versions. I would have rather that George left the redundant "(Version Two)" off and replaced it with "I Live For You" which was not officially released until the 2001 CD reissue. Also performed on George Harrison’s "Live in Japan" album and tour in 1991. George also demoed this in 1969 with The Beatles. That version has not been officially released. It was later included on 2009’s "Let it Roll – Songs by George Harrison".

Is This Love? by Paul McCartney – **

First Released: 2008

Fireman track that is trancier than the rest of the "Electric Arguments" album, and sounds more like earlier Fireman stuff. Paul sings it like a Gregorian chant.

Intuition by John Lennon – ***

First released: 1973

A jaunty upbeat song from the otherwise bland "Mind Games" album from John Lennon. I really like the instrumental break in the middle of the song. And it’s on 1990’s Lennon and "Working Class Hero" from 2005.

Introduction by George Harrison and Ravi Shankar – ***

First released: 1971

This is alternately known as George Harrison/Ravi Shankar Introduction. The opening comments of "The Concert for Bangla Desh" wouldn’t be notable except for the very funny recovery quip Ravi said about the Indian musicians tuning their instruments. Ah, so much for World Music.

Introduction by The Beatles – **

First released: 1977

Spoken word track that introduces The Beatles on "Live at the Star-Club, Hamburg 1962". There is another track by this name on Ringo’s "Live 2006" album from 2008, but it really is "It Don’t Come Easy".

"Introducing the Beatles" by The Beatles – ***

First released: 1963

The first album officially released in the US, although virtually concurrent with Capitol's "Meet The Beatles". This is essentially the US equivalent of the UK "Please Please Me", although there were two versions released. One had "Love Me Do" and "PS I Love You", and a later version saw those tracks replaced with "Please Please Me" and "Ask Me Why". I remember finding a late 70s reissue of this album and asked my grandmother to purchase it for me as I was starting to become a major fan. She did not want to buy it despite the budget line price, because she felt that The Beatles' hair was too long!! If you've seen this album cover, this features a cover photo that has them with almost the shortest hair of their career!

Interview With J&Y December 8th, 1980 by John Lennon – ***

First released: 1980

Though released to TV and a number of places for years, both legit and otherwise, this interview snippet from John’s last day was given an official CD release on the 2001 reissue of "Milk and Honey". It’s both haunting and joyous to hear.

Interview by Paul McCartney – ***

First released: 1999

This single-track release features a taped 1999 interview with Paul McCartney at a press conference in Siegen, Germany, during which he answers questions about the exhibition of his paintings in that town.

Interlude (Lament) by Paul McCartney – ***

First released: 2006

Another track from Paul's classical "Ecce Cor Meum" album.

Instrumental by The Beatles – ***

Unreleased.

This umbrella title has been given to various instrumentals that The Beatles performed during their 1969 "Get Back" sessions and McCartney has for various solo noodling.

Instant Karma (We All Shine On) by John Lennon – ****

First released: 1970

An instant Lennon classic. This ranks right up there with any great Beatles tune and should have been #1. It came close. It was never released on any album until the 1975 "Shaved Fish" compilation. It’s also on "The John Lennon Collection" from 1982, 1990’s "Lennon", "Lennon Legend" from 1997, "Instant Karma" from 2001, and "Working Class Hero" from 2005, and 2006’s "Remember". "The U.S. vs. John Lennon" version from 2006 contains dialogue from the film. A remixed version is on the import only "Peace, Love & Truth" from 2005. Lennon also performed this live in 1972 and this version was released in 1986 on "Live in New York City". This version was also on "Instant Karma" from 2001. It’s alternately known as just simply "Instant Karma".

"Instant Karma - All Time Greatest Hits" by John Lennon – ***

First released: 2001

Another retread greatest hits box set of John Lennon music. This one was designed for the budget line market of such stores as Costco and for people who have no clue who the fuck John Lennon is. With three CDs at $18.99 list and including 35 tracks, this is quite the bargain. However, as a completist, I already own these tracks several times over. I would recommend getting "Lennon Legend", "Rock ‘n’ Roll" and "Live in New York City" as three comparable CDs that at least make more sense than these haphazard collections.

Instant Amnesia by Ringo Starr – ****

First released: 2003

Another heavy duty thumper from "Ringo Rama". This features Ringo’s adlibbed drum segment with synsonic drums that sound like he’s playing the chimes.

Inside Out by Traveling Wilburys – ***

First released: 1990

Another song on the not quite as strong "Traveling Wilburys, Volume 3" album. This is more of a group singalong with George in there somewhere.

Monday, April 26, 2010

Inner Light, The by The Beatles – ***

First released: 1968

Lovely George song that was largely forgotten until it first appeared on CD on "Past Masters, Volume Two" in 1988. Before that it was the b-side of "Lady Madonna", and when it was time to make the "Hey Jude" compilation in 1970, this song was inexplicably left off in favor of the likes of "Can't Buy Me Love" and "I Should Have Known Better". It is also used for 2006's "Love" with the subtitle "(Transition)".

Jeff Lynne remembered it for "Concert For George" and did a fine rendition of it live.

Inner City Madness by Paul McCartney – ***

First released: 1990

A live version was performed on 1990’s "Tripping the Live Fantastic".

India by Paul McCartney – ***

First released: 2002

Live track unreleased anywhere else but the DVD bonus tracks on "Back in the US". It has nothing to do with the Lennon song of the same name.

India by John Lennon – ***

First released: 2005

Interesting that both John and Paul released songs with this title. I guess the country did leave an impression on them, but I prefer John's version from 1979, although it remained unreleased until "Lennon: The Musical" in 2005.

Indeed I Do by Paul McCartney – (NR)

Unreleased.

I've tried and tried to obtain a copy of this unreleased McCartney tune from 1970 to no avail. If you have it, let me know and I'll update this book for the next edition.

In the Studio by The Beatles – ***

Unreleased.

Umbrella title given by a bootlegger to various session outtakes that were used in "The Beatles Anthology" TV show and subsequent video releases.

In the Park by George Harrison – **

First released: 1968

This almost sounds the same from "Tabla and Pakavaj" off of the same album "Wonderwall Music", and as such kind of dull.

In the Middle of an Island by The Beatles – ***

Unreleased.

The Beatles performed a version of this song popularized by Tony Bennett during their 1969 "Get Back" sessions.

In the Court of the Crimson King by Greg Lake – ****

Unreleased.

Greg Lake performs a great live version of this classic King Crimson tune that was left off of every CD and video compilation of those 2002 Ringo Starr & His New All-Starr Band concerts, probably due to contractual reasons.

In the City by Joe Walsh – ***

First released: 1993

A live version by Joe Walsh appears on "Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band Volume 2 Live From Montreux" in 1993 (this version reissued on 2000’s "The Anthology…So Far").

In Spite of All the Danger by The Beatles – ***

First released: 1995

The b-side of The Beatles' (actually The Quarry Men at this point) first disc recording "That'll Be The Day", recorded in 1958. This is the only McCartney/Harrison tune to surface to date, which is a shame as they had ample time to compose together again. It appears in the best quality they could muster on "Anthology 1".

In Private by Paul McCartney – ***

First released: 2007

One of three bonus tracks on the two-disc version of Paul’s "Memory Almost Full". It’s a competently played instrumental, but nothing special. It does show off Paul’s remarkable guitar playing after all of these years.

In My Life by The Beatles – ****

First released: 1965

A very sweet song that gets better every single year. And you thought that only McCartney could compose stuff like this. It’s as inciteful as The Beach Boys’ "In My Room". George performed it on his 1974 Dark Horse tour and it’s on the "Imagine: John Lennon" soundtrack from 1988. It was originally on "Rubber Soul". It also appears on 1973's "1962-1966".

In My Dreams by Paul McCartney – ***

Unreleased.

Unreleased McCartney demo dating from the 1974 "Piano Tapes".

Sunday, April 25, 2010

In My Car by Ringo Starr – ***

First released: 1983

This song was released as a single in Germany, to little response and is from Ringo’s "Old Wave" album. Co-composer Joe Walsh decided to re-record it for his own "Got Any Gum?" album in 1987 to no additional success. The song was also included on "Starr Struck: Best of Ringo Starr, Vol. 2" in 1989.

In Liverpool by Paul McCartney – ***

Unreleased.

Kind of slow track dating from 1997 by McCartney that could have been released on "Flaming Pie".

In a Heartbeat by Ringo Starr – **

First released: 1992

Decent if unmemorable tune from Ringo’s "Time Takes Time" album.

Improvisation by The Beatles – **

Unreleased.

Unreleased Lennon/McCartney instrumentals dating from the 1960 home recordings.

Imagine Me There by Ringo Starr – ***

First released: 2003

Ringo sings this sweet ballad well from the excellent "Ringo Rama" album. It’s also on 2008’s "5.1".

"Imagine: John Lennon" (feature) by John Lennon – ****

First released: 1988

Essential viewing along with "The Beatles Anthology", "Wingspan" and "Best of The Beatles". Although not intended originally, this documentary feature is an excellent companion piece to "The Beatles Anthology". It covers in great detail Lennon’s solo career from 1970-1980 with copious interviews and footage from his life and narrated by John himself culled from hours of taped interviews. My favorite scene is when the Lennons discover a homeless bum on their land and after John telling the man that he wasn’t writing to the man, instead mainly writing about himself or maybe Yoko, he invites the man in for a bite to eat.

"Imagine: John Lennon" by John Lennon – ****

First released: 1988

Soundtrack album that accompanied the film and featured the first ever release of Lennon’s "Real Love", "Imagine (Rehearsal)", and The Beatles' "A Day in the Life" sans the "Sgt. Pepper" fadeout. A very good compilation and the only single disc compilation to feature the best of Lennon’s Beatles tunes alongside his solo work. A single of "Jealous Guy" was released.

Saturday, April 24, 2010

"Imagine" by John Lennon – ****

First released: 1971

A solid but less rough album as "John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band". The only downside is the seemingly endless "I Don’t Wanna Be a Soldier Mama". In fact, the entire album minus this track made it onto 1990’s "Lennon". No bonus tracks were added to the remixed and remastered 2000 CD reissue as it is a very solid piece on its own.

Imagine by John Lennon – ****

First released: 1971

The definitive John Lennon song. It has appeared as a single and on the album of the same name and a movie of the same name (twice!) and on every Lennon compilation ever released. It’s great. So is the video of Lennon at the piano while Yoko opens the drapes. A highlight of the 1975 "Shaved Fish" compilation. It’s also on "The John Lennon Collection" from 1982, the "Imagine: John Lennon" soundtrack from 1988, 1990’s "Lennon", "Lennon Legend" from 1997, "Working Class Hero" from 2005, 2006’s "Remember", and "The U.S. vs. John Lennon" from 2006. A remixed version is on the import only "Peace, Love & Truth" from 2005. A demo version of this appeared in the movie and on the soundtrack of "Imagine: John Lennon" with the title of "Imagine (Rehearsal)" in 1988. Lennon also performed this live in 1972 and this version was released in 1986 on "Live in New York City". A 1971 live version appears on 1998’s "The John Lennon Anthology" and 2004’s "Acoustic". A demo version called "Imagine (take 1)" appears on 1998’s "The John Lennon Anthology" and "Wonsaponatime".

Illusions by John Lennon – (NR)

Unreleased.

A Lennon demo exists with this title.

Iko Iko by Dr. John – ***

First released: 1990

A live version by Dr. John appears on 1990’s "Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band" (this version reissued on 2000’s "The Anthology…So Far").

If You’ve Got Trouble by The Beatles – ***

First released: 1996

Notorious unreleased Ringo Beatles song from 1965 isn't as bad as it sounds. Yes, the performance is a bit lifeless, but with a few more tries, it might have made it on the album. Personally, I like it better than "What Goes On" which was released. Finally, it was officially released on "Anthology 2".

If You Wanna by Paul McCartney – ***

First released: 1997

Nice sounding song from Paul's "Flaming Pie". It fits in the same mold as "The Song We Were Singing" that precedes it.

If You Gotta Make a Fool of Somebody by The Beatles – ***

Unreleased.

The Beatles used to perform this in their live show, namely at the Cavern in 1962.

If You Belonged to Me by Traveling Wilburys – **

First released: 1990

Another track from George’s "Traveling Wilburys, Volume 3". Nothing terribly remarkable about it.

If You Believe by George Harrison – ***

First released: 1979

A fitting closer for the "George Harrison" album with a strong upbeat sound and it makes one long for another Harrison album (which was two years away).

If Not For You by George Harrison – ***

First released: 1970

Written by and released concurrently by Bob Dylan on his "New Morning" album, this harmless tune is one of the more country sounding songs on George’s "All Things Must Pass". This probably has to do with Dylan releasing "Nashville Skyline" the previous year. When "The Concert for Bangla Desh" was reissued in 2005, an additional performance of this song surfaced that didn’t make the final cut.

If It's Love That You Want by Ringo Starr – ***

First released: 2008

Another good track from Ringo’s "Liverpool 8". Just a decent all-out rocker with a 50s feel to it.

If I Were Not Upon the Stage by Paul McCartney – ***

First released: 1990

I always think of the Monty Python skit when I hear this, with John Cleese wanting to be a train engineer instead of a barrister. A live version was performed by Paul on 1990’s "Tripping the Live Fantastic".

If I Needed Someone by The Beatles – ****

First released: 1965

As I said on my review for "Think For Yourself", George finally figured out how to compose. Having two great tracks on one album was quite an accomplishment, but he was to do even better later. Anyway, it’s on "Rubber Soul". Also released on "The Best of George Harrison" and is George’s earliest release to make that compilation. Also performed on George Harrison’s "Live in Japan" album and tour in 1991.

Thursday, April 22, 2010

If I Fell by The Beatles – ***

First released: 1964

Another classic track from "A Hard Day’s Night" and "Something New" and also issued as yet another single in the US. The Rutles plagiarized this tune with their own "With a Girl Like You". As I’ve always been prone to make up nonsense lyrics to Beatles tunes I like as much as tunes I hate, I used to sing, “If I fell upon the floor, would you trample on me more…”

I’ve Only Got Two Hands by Paul McCartney – **

First released: 2005

Another dull track from Paul's "Chaos and Creation in the Back Yard". Paul pounds away at the piano in this instrumental. The middle part isn’t too bad, however. The song is actually hidden at the end of the track Anyway. Whoopee.

I’ve Just Seen a Face by The Beatles – ****

First released: 1965

This was a splendid opener for the US "Rubber Soul", which was relegated to the non-soundtrack side of "Help!" in the UK. As a result, I’ve never have gotten used to the song’s omission on the former. A live version was performed by Wings and released on "Wings Over America" in 1976. McCartney does a different live take of the song on "Unplugged (The Official Bootleg)" in 1991.

I’ve Had Enough by Paul McCartney – ***

First released: 1978

Second single off of McCartney and Wings' "London Town". While good, it should have been a little bit grittier. In other words, Paul sounds like a wimp singing "No no no no no no no" which comes out sounding more like "ne-oh" instead of an affirmative "NO". He did better on "Back to the Egg" with the similar sounding "Spin It On".

“I’ve Got Blisters…” by Ringo Starr – ***

First released: 1998

Ringo explains that it was he and not John who shouted “I’ve got blisters on my fingers!” at the end of "Helter Skelter" on 1998’s "VH1 Storytellers".

I’ve Got a Feeling by The Beatles – ****

First released: 1970

Highlight of the "Let it Be" album that wasn't a single. In the film, Paul pushes the other three Beatles to get the descending guitar line correct, but he was right and it is an excellent part of the composition. The 2003 "Naked" version almost sounds identical.

Lennon's "Everybody Had a Hard Year" made it in as the middle part of the song. A demo version appears on "Anthology 3" in 1996. Paul performs it live on 2009’s "Good Evening New York City".

I’ve Changed My Mind by Ringo Starr – **

Unreleased.

Unreleased Ringo tune from the aborted Chips Moman sessions in 1987.

Wednesday, April 21, 2010

I’m Yours by Ringo Starr – ***

First released: 1998

Ringo’s never been really good at singing ballads but continues to do so from time to time. This song is strongly reminiscent of "Good Night" from The Beatles’ ‘White Album’. It is the album closer for the standard version of Ringo’s "Vertical Man".

I’m the Greatest by Ringo Starr – ****

First released: 1973

This is the famous session that had Lennon, Starr and Harrison in the same room recording for the first time together since the breakup. Lennon composed the tune and is one of his best songs that he ever gave away. I love it. If there could or should have been a fourth single off of "Ringo", this should have been it. It was also included on Ringo’s "Blast From Your Past" compilation in 1975 and 2007’s "Photograph" compilation. Ringo eventually performed it live on his many All-Starr band tours and also did a slightly different take for his 1978 "Ringo" TV special. The live version appears on 1993’s "Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band Volume 2 Live From Montreux" (this version reissued on 2000’s "The Anthology…So Far"). A different live version appears on 2007's "Live at Soundstage". There’s also a demo version by John Lennon released on 1998’s "The John Lennon Anthology" that was recorded in 1970.

I’m Talking About You by The Beatles – ***

First released: 1977

The Beatles performed it live on "Live at the Star-Club, Hamburg 1962" in 1977. Such energy!

I’m Stepping Out by John Lennon – **

First released: 1984

Unfortunately, this sounds like a rehearsal take as there’s a lot of Lennon gibberish and talk that probably wouldn’t have made it onto the final take, but what can you do when your lead singer is no longer around. I would have punched up this song as well as things seem missing. It was the second or third single from John and Yoko’s "Milk and Honey" depending on what country you were from. Not to be confused at all with Joe Jackson’s similarly sounding song title from about this same time. And it’s on 1990’s "Lennon" and "Working Class Hero" from 2005. A demo version released as "Stepping Out (Home Version)" was added to the 2001 "Milk and Honey" reissue. There’s also a demo version released on 1998’s "The John Lennon Anthology".

I’m So Tired by The Beatles – ***

First released: 1968

Lennon really does sound tired on this song and I suppose that's the point. It's from the "White Album". What's interesting is that McCartney took a stab at it on some bootleg and made it livelier than it should have been. A demo version appears on "Anthology 3" in 1996.

I’m Partial to Your Abracadabra by Paul McCartney – ***

First released: 2001

Acceptable McCartney cover of an Ian Dury song from an Ian Dury tribute album called "Partial to Your Boots and Panties", but nothing more. The brass section is what saves it.

I’m Only Sleeping by The Beatles – ****

First released: 1966

John’s companion to "I’m So Tired" (to be released in 1968). A great baseline from The Beatles UK "Revolver". In America, this was one of three tracks that was plucked for "Yesterday and Today". A couple of demo versions (called (rehearsal) and (Take 1)) appear on "Anthology 2" in 1996.

I’m Moving On by Yoko Ono – **

First released: 1980

Not one of Yoko’s better tunes from John and Yoko’s "Double Fantasy", but it strangely complements Lennon’s "I’m Losing You", which is what makes the "Double Fantasy" album a good compilation. A demo version was added to the 2001 "Milk and Honey" reissue.

I’m Losing You by John Lennon – ***

First released: 1980

I wasn’t terribly fond of this track when I first heard it. I didn’t like Lennon’s guttural growl at the beginning and I didn’t like the guitar lick. I like it now, but it’s still not my favorite Lennon track. It’s from John and Yoko’s "Double Fantasy" and it’s also on "The John Lennon Collection" from 1982 and 1990’s "Lennon". There’s an original version with Cheap Trick backing that wasn’t released until "The John Lennon Anthology" and "Wonsaponatime" in 1998. That version was also included on "Working Class Hero" from 2005 and 2006’s "Remember". There’s also another demo version released with the title "Stranger’s Room" on 1998’s "The John Lennon Anthology".

I’m Looking Through You by The Beatles – ****

First released: 1965

I like the instrumentation again on this. By 1965, The Beatles were really improving in this area so much that it sounded like another “voice”. Listen to the part after Paul sings “You’re not the same!” (bamp-amp, diddle diddle, bamp-amp, diddle diddle if you could write it out). It’s on the UK version of "Rubber Soul". A demo version appears on "Anthology 2" in 1996.

I’m In Love Again by Paul McCartney – ***

First released: 1989

Additional track added to the CD version of Paul's "Choba B CCCP" that was also a b-side to the "This One" CD single. It was originally written and recorded by Fats Domino in 1956.

I’m In Love by The Beatles – ***

Unreleased.

Unreleased Lennon/McCartney demo from 1963 that was given away to The Foremost. It should have been included on "Anthology 1".

I’m Home by Ringo Starr – **

First released: 2003

One of three bonus tracks from the "Deluxe Edition" of "Ringo Rama". Not quite as good as the standard album track, so it's easy to see why this was originally left off.

I’m Happy Just to Dance With You by The Beatles – **

First released: 1964

An ok track from "A Hard Day’s Night", but somewhat awkward given its awkward title.

Tuesday, April 20, 2010

I’m Gonna Sit Right Down and Cry Over You by The Beatles – ***

First released: 1977

Snappy Elvis tune that The Beatles liked to play live in their early years. The most famous performance is from "Live at the Star-Club, Hamburg 1962" from 1977. A version for the radio from 1963 appears on "Live at the BBC" in 1994.

I’m Gonna Be a Wheel Someday by Paul McCartney – ***

First released: 1988

Another 1956 Fats Domino cover from Paul's "Choba B CCCP". Great tune! It was also a b-side to the "My Brave Face" CD single.

I’m Gone by Jeff Lynne – ***

First released: 1990

B-side of Jeff Lynne’s "Every Little Thing" single. The song did not appear on the album "Armchair Theatre", so it’s unknown as to whether George appeared on this track, but he probably did.

I’m Down by The Beatles – ****

First released: 1965

A most excellent b-side of "Help!" that was frequently performed live by The Beatles during 1965-1966, the solid rocker should have found a home on "Yesterday and Today" or "Hey Jude", but somehow managed to escape inclusion on a Beatles album until the 1976 "Rock ‘n’ Roll Music" compilation. McCartney resurrected the track for live performing in the late 90s and different live versions appear on 2002’s "The Concert for New York City" and on 2009’s "Good Evening New York City". It first appeared on CD on "Past Masters, Volume One" in 1988. A demo version appears on "Anthology 2" in 1996.

I’m Carrying by Paul McCartney – **

First released: 1978

This song is ok. The part I never cared for is the squeaky guitar. I suppose that's supposed to make it more intimate. I equate it to nails on a chalkboard. I like "London Town" as an album, but this is one of the lesser moments. It was also the b-side of the "London Town" single.

I’m a Man by John Lennon – (NR)

Unreleased.

Lennon performed a version of this in 1980.

I’m a Loser by The Beatles – ****

First released: 1964

The highlight of this song has always been where Lennon lowers his voice a couple of octaves. I can’t even remember an example where he did that anywhere else. The song was originally from "Beatles For Sale". A 1964 radio version appears on 1994's "Live at the BBC".

I’m a Fool to Care by Ringo Starr – ***

First released: 1970

This song was a hit for Les Paul and Mary Ford in 1954, written by Ted Daffan. Ringo recorded it for "Sentimental Journey". Beatles stalwart Klaus Voorman arranged the track for Ringo.

I’ll Still Love You by Ringo Starr – ***

First released: 1976

George Harrison outtake from the "All Things Must Pass" sessions from 1970 that Ringo recorded in 1976 for his "Ringo’s Rotogravure" album. Amazingly, George sued Ringo over his recording. George doesn’t appear on the Ringo version.

I’ll Keep You Satisfied by The Beatles – ***

Unreleased.

Lennon/McCartney song given to Billy J. Kramer and the Dakotas in 1963. I don't know if a Beatles version exists. I haven't heard it.

I’ll Give You a Ring by Paul McCartney – ****

First released: 1982

Light, bouncy song that was originally the b-side of "Take it Away". When the "Tug of War" album was remastered, no bonus tracks were added, although this would have been a prime candidate for inclusion, and to date it still eludes inclusion on any CD.

I’ll Get You by The Beatles – ***

First released: 1963

I didn't like this song the first time I heard it. In fact, I thought it was out of tune. Maybe it was my 45. The b-side of "She Loves You". It sounds much better on CD when released on "Past Masters, Volume One" in 1988. A live version from the London Palladium in 1963 appeared on "Anthology 1" in 1995.

I’ll Follow the Sun by The Beatles – ***

First released: 1964

Apparently this was some song in McCartney’s bag of tricks that he pulled out when The Beatles were short on material due to constant touring and TV and movie appearances. It’s not a bad tune, but having this knowledge proves that it is not as accomplished as the stuff they were currently writing. It was originally on "Beatles For Sale". The Beatles attempted it as early as 1960 when they did some home recordings. A 1964 radio version appears on the b-side of the 1994 single of "Baby It's You" and not on "Live at the BBC".

I’ll Cry Instead by The Beatles – ****

First released: 1964

This song was not originally part of the "A Hard Day’s Night" film, but was added in a 1982 prologue for the theatrical reissue, which is how I saw the film for the first time. As such, it was on the non-soundtrack side of the "Hard Day’s Night" album in the UK, but apparently it was originally set for inclusion in the film and so it appears on the US soundtrack album as well and even given that credit on "Something New". Also listed as "I Cry Instead" on some early labels of the soundtrack.

Monday, April 19, 2010

I’ll Be On My Way by The Beatles – ***

First released: 1994

Lennon/McCartney original given to Billy J. Kramer and the Dakotas, but also performed by The Beatles in 1963 for inclusion on "Live at the BBC".

I’ll Be Fine Anywhere by Ringo Starr – ***

First released: 1998

Bouncy, 1950s-inspired track from Ringo’s "Vertical Man" album.

I’ll Be Back by The Beatles – ***

First released: 1964

My favorite version of this song is now the ones that appear on "Anthology 1" showing the evolution of the song from a 3/4-time song to a 4/4-time song where Lennon has difficulty singing the oddly timed version (referred to as take 2 and take 3). The original (which is great too, mind you) appears on the non-soundtrack side of "A Hard Day’s Night".

I’ll Always Be in Love with You by The Beatles – **

Unreleased.

The Beatles record this Lennon demo in 1960 on a home tape recorder. To date, this has not been released.

I’d Have You Anytime by George Harrison – ***

First released: 1970

One of the better tunes on the over-produced "All Things Must Pass" set featuring some fine guitar work from George Harrison. It’s a very catchy tune to boot, co-written with Bob Dylan.

I’d Be Talking All The Time by Ringo Starr – **

First released: 1970

Ringo sings a typical country song on "Beaucoups of Blues".

I Wouldn’t Have You Any Other Way by Ringo Starr – **

First released: 1970

Ringo sings a typical country song on "Beaucoups of Blues".

Saturday, April 17, 2010

I Would Only Smile by Denny Laine – **

First released: 1980

Although Paul and Wings recorded this way back in 1972, this Denny Laine sung composition didn't get an official release until his "Japanese Tears" album in 1980. Kind of a country twang, but nothing much else. Laine would go on to compose better things for Wings.

I Won’t Back Down by Tom Petty – ***

First released: 1989

Tom Petty song that features most of The Traveling Wilburys from his album "Full Moon Fever". George provides backing vocals and George and Ringo are in the music video.

I Will by The Beatles – ***

First released: 1968

Light, ballad from the "White Album" that has only received the attention it deserves in recent years, probably because McCartney revived it in concert. He also played a bit of it on the ukelele for the "Anthology" TV show with George and Ringo in tow. A demo version appears on "Anthology 3" in 1996.

I Watch Your Face by John Lennon – (NR)

Unreleased.

Unreleased Lennon demo dating from 1979.

I Was Walkin’ by Ringo Starr – ***

First released: 1998

Decent rocker from Ringo’s "Vertical Man" album that has a "Sgt. Pepper"-inspired middle section with some groovy psychedelic sounds. A live version appears on 1998’s "VH1 Storytellers" with different but just as trippy middle section.

I Want You To Fly by Paul McCartney – **

First released: 2005

Another dull track from Paul's "Chaos and Creation in the Back Yard" sessions. It's the b-side from the "Jenny Wren" single.

I Want You (She’s So Heavy) by The Beatles – ****

First released: 1969

An interesting story about this song. I became a quick fan of Mobile Fidelity Sound Labs version of "Abbey Road" due to this song. I had played this song on my parent's old copy of "Abbey Road" and liked it, but I really LOVED it when I heard the remastering. The organ solo really came to the fore on that version where I never even heard it before. That turned out to be my favorite part of the song. The "white noise" also makes more sense as I just thought it was a scratchy old album.

Of course, with the advent of the CD, this made all of this moot, but it was fun when I first heard those hidden treasures. It is also used for 2006's "Love".

I Want You unreleased by The Beatles

Unreleased.

Another phony Beatles release listed for the sake of completeness.

I Want To Walk You Home by Paul McCartney – ***

First released: 2007

Paul McCartney song recorded with Allen Toussaint from "Goin' Home: A Tribute to Fats Domino".

I Want To Tell You by The Beatles – ****

First released: 1966

George pulls an “Eight Days a Week” by having this song fade in, but it doesn’t matter. If you’re going to rip off someone, it might as well be your bandmates! It was originally from "Revolver". Also performed on George Harrison’s "Live in Japan" album and tour in 1991.

I Want To Hold Your Hand by The Beatles – ****

First released: 1964

The song that broke America in. Differing reports state that this was planned, while other reports said that it was just a fluke. I wasn't there, so I don't know. The only thing I do know is that it was a tremendous hit. Where I first heard it was on the David Frost documentary about The Beatles and they played a snippet of the song from "The Beatles" cartoon show where they sing and play to an octopus (shades of "Octopus's Garden"?). I thought that was a pretty catchy tune, but they lyrics seemed kind of simple-minded until I found out years later what "hold your hand" really meant! It was only a single in the UK, but a single and on the album "Meet the Beatles" in the US. Later on, it was on "A Collection of Beatles Oldies", "1962-1966", "20 Greatest Hits" and 'Past Masters, Volume One" in 1988. Strangely, it wasn't performed live much after 1964. It's also on 2000's "1". A live version from 1963 appears on "Anthology 1" in 1995. It is also used for 2006's "Love".

(I Want To) Come Home by Paul McCartney – **

First released: 2009

Song featured at the end of the Robert DeNiro picture "Everybody’s Fine". It was available as a download and a promo CD single, but to date has not appeared on any album. Kind of a peaceful "Imagine" sort of sounding song by Paul.

I Wanna Be Your Man by The Beatles – ****

First released: 1963

This is the notorious song that John and Paul dashed off for The Rolling Stones for their next single. When Ringo needed a song for "With The Beatles", they recorded it themselves. The Stones version has a more chugging rhythm than The Beatles version, but both are among my favorites. A 1964 radio version appears on 1994's "Live at the BBC".

A 1964 live version appears on "Anthology 1" in 1995. Different live versions appear on "Ringo Starr and His Third All-Starr Band Volume 1" from 1997, 2000’s "The Anthology…So Far", 2002’s "Ringo & His New All-Starr Band", 2004’s "Tour 2003", 2007's "Live at Soundstage" and the "Live 2006" album from 2008. Paul performs a soundcheck version for 1993’s "Paul is Live".

I Wanna Cry by Paul McCartney – ***

First released: 1989

Paul recorded this song at the same time as "Choba B CCCP", but released as the b-side of "This One" from the "Flowers in the Dirt" album. It has kind of a rock and roll sound, but Paul decided to keep the Russian album totally full of covers.

Thursday, April 15, 2010

"I Wanna Be Santa Claus" by Ringo Starr – ***

First released: 1999

One would think that McCartney would be the first to release a Christmas album, but to date he still has not save for the "Wonderful Christmastime"/"Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reggae" single from 1979. Anyway, Ringo’s album is half Christmas standards and half new compositions. The new ones repeat the excellence found on "Vertical Man" and the standards are as good as one could find on anyone else’s Christmas album, so overall all it is a fun time and stands up well to repeat holiday plays. The highlight is Ringo’s remake of The Beatles’ "Christmas Time is Here Again", one of the few fully-realized tunes from "The Beatles Christmas Record" days.

I Wanna Be Santa Claus by Ringo Starr – ***

First released: 1999

A somewhat silly tune from the Ringo Christmas album from the same name about how Ringo wanting to be Santa Claus.

I Threw It All Away by The Beatles – ***

Unreleased.

The Beatles ran through a version of this Bob Dylan tune during their 1969 "Get Back" sessions and George did again during his 1970 "All Things Must Pass" sessions.

I Think Therefore I Rock N Roll by Ringo Starr – ***

First released: 2003

Another Ringo rocker from the highly abundant "Ringo Rama" album.

I Still Love Rock ‘n’ Roll by Ian Hunter – ***

First released: 2003

A live version by Ian Hunter appears on 2003’s "Extended Versions".

I Should Have Known Better by The Beatles – ****

First released: 1964

Similar to music videos, I can’t think of this song without thinking of The Beatles playing cards on a train. This was the b-side of "A Hard Day’s Night" single and was strongly featured on the soundtrack album as well.

I Shall Be Released by The Beatles – ***

Unreleased.

The Beatles performed a version of this Bob Dylan classic during their 1969 "Get Back" sessions.

"I Secured them...a Beatle drink even then" by Brian Epstein – **

First released: 1995

Brian Epstein reading from his autobiography about The Beatles called "A Cellar Full of Noise" from "Anthology 1".

I Saw Her Standing There by The Beatles – ****

First released: 1963

For England, the lead off track of their first LP "Please Please Me". For Americans, the b-side of the "I Want to Hold Your Hand" 45 RPM single. Either way, a very strong track. I probably first heard it on the b-side or quite possibly the "Meet The Beatles" album and felt it was leaps and bounds ahead of what was on "Please Please Me" and it felt more at home on "Meet".

Later on, this song appeared on the "Rock and Roll Music" compilation and in a 1963 radio versions on "The Beatles Live at the BBC" that appeared in 1994. In any case, it has always been a great early rocker. A demo version appeared on the b-side of the "Free As a Bird" CD single.

Possibly the most amusing version over the years has got to be the 1974 version John Lennon played live on stage with Elton John as this was a McCartney original. Lennon’s comments beforehand about McCartney being his fiancĂ© are quite funny. It originally appeared as the b-side of Elton’s "Philadelphia Freedom" and later was released to CD on 1990’s "Lennon". Different live versions were performed by Paul on 1990’s "Tripping the Live Fantastic", 2002/3's "Back in the US/World", the "Amoeba’s Secret" 12” and CD from 2007 and on 2009’s "Good Evening New York City". The Beatles also performed it live on "Live at the Star-Club, Hamburg 1962" from 1977. A different live version from 1963 appears on "Anthology 1" in 1995.

I Sat Belonely by John Lennon – ***

Unreleased.

Not officially released to record comes this John Lennon reading of one of his poems from his books dating from 1964 and 1965.

I Remember You by The Beatles – ***

First released: 1977

The Beatles performed it live on "Live at the Star-Club, Hamburg 1962" in 1977.

I Remember Jeep by George Harrison – **

First released: 1970

One of the instrumental tracks from the "Apple Jam" portion of George’s "All Things Must Pass".

I Really Love You by George Harrison – ***

First released: 1982

If you don’t like George Harrison’s singing, this may be the song for you as the vocals are credited to Willie Greene, Bobby King and Pico Pena along with George. Willie really is the lead singer with his low voice singing and he does it to great effect. George felt strong enough about this old Swearingen recording that he even released it as a single! Didn’t chart, though. I like it. From "Gone Troppo".

I Really Love Her by Ringo Starr – **

First released: 2003

Mystery track after "English Garden" from "Ringo Rama". It's a nice, sweet, almost uncharacteristic ballad, but Ringo definitely loves Barbara the way John loved Yoko. It’s also on the DVD disc included with 2008’s "5.1".

Tuesday, April 13, 2010

I Owe It All to You by Paul McCartney – **

First released: 1993

Somewhat weak track that doesn't seem to have an ending from Paul's "Off the Ground".

I Need You by The Beatles – ***

First released: 1965

Poor George Harrison. He boldly states twice in "Help!" that "I Need You" was composed by him. Though he was probably tooting his own horn because of being quite proud of his latest composition, he was also probably trying to alert people that he was indeed composing at all. By 1965, many assumed that Lennon/McCartney composed everything, even the songs that they covered like "Till There Was You", etc. It was only a matter of time, when Harrison would become an equal to his peers. It is of course on the "Help!" album.

I Must Be in Love by The Rutles – ****

First released: 1976

The first Rutles recording. There are actually two versions of this song: the original which appeared in the "Rutland Weekend Television" series and album and also shown on "Saturday Night Live" and the second version which was released as a single in 1978 as part of the "All You Need is Cash" Rutles special. An excellent recording that captures all of the clichés of early Beatles pop hits composed by Neil Innes and just a little bit too close to Lennon/McCartney so that some later pressing give them credit as well.

I Me Mine by The Beatles – ****

First released: 1970

Historically significant as the last Beatles song until the "Anthology" reunion. Though there was at least one more session with Ringo in attendance, this was the last time Paul, George and Ringo sat down and recorded something new. The ¾ waltz was recorded officially after it was discovered that the demo version from a year earlier was to be released in the "Let it Be" movie. John does not play on this tune, which is alright, because in the film version, he is seen waltzing with Yoko Ono and not playing there, either. One of my favorite Beatles tunes. The original recording length was less than two minutes so the recording was artificially extended. The original version was finally released on "Anthology 3" in 1996. The "Naked" version is virtually identical.

I Love This House by Paul McCartney – **

First released: 1997

Originally recorded by Paul in 1984, it finally did get released as one of the numerous b-side tracks from "Oobu Joobu Part 1" from the UK "Young Boy" CD single. Not quite polished enough and I can see why it stayed in the can.

I Love My Suit by Ringo Starr – **

Unreleased.

Jingle sung by Ringo in Japan for a line of Simple Life Suits in 1976.

I Lost My Little Girl by Paul McCartney – **

First released: 1991

Supposedly the first song Paul ever wrote. There is a studio outtake circa 1974 that has never been released with some added lyrics about this being the first song he wrote. McCartney does a live take on the song on "Unplugged (The Official Bootleg)" in 1991, and that was released to CD.

Monday, April 12, 2010

I Live For You by George Harrison – ***

First released: 2001

An outtake from "All Things Must Pass" that was included on the 2001 reissue, I much would have preferred this tune be included than another version of "Isn’t it a Pity".

I Lie Around by Paul McCartney – ***

First released: 1973

The b-side of "Live and Let Die" and I believe the first Denny Laine-sung vocal on a Wings record. It’s a nice pleasant number with some fun special effects at the beginning of McCartney jumping in the water to go for a swim. Not released on an album until many years later on the 1990 "Red Rose Speedway" CD reissue.

I Know (I Know) by John Lennon – ***

First released: 1973

One of my favorite tunes off of John Lennon’s "Mind Games" album. A nice, good, hummable tune. There’s also a demo version released on 1998’s "The John Lennon Anthology" just called "I Know".

I Know a Place by Ringo Starr – **

First released: 1977

Harmless Ringo tune from "Scouse the Mouse".

I Keep On Believing by Paul McCartney – (NR)

Unreleased.

Unreleased McCartney tune dating from 1977.

I Keep Forgettin’ by Ringo Starr – ***

First released: 1983

Ringo recorded a version of this old 1962 Chuck Jackson hit for his "Old Wave" album that David Bowie also recorded in 1984. The song was also included on "Starr Struck: Best of Ringo Starr, Vol. 2" in 1989.

I Just Want to Make Love to You by The Beatles – ***

Unreleased.

The Beatles ran through this standard blues track popularized by The Rolling Stones during their 1969 "Get Back" sessions.

Sunday, April 11, 2010

I Just Don’t Understand by The Beatles – ***

First released: 1994

Ann Margret had a hit with this in 1961. The Beatles performed this in 1963 and that version appears on 1994's "Live at the BBC".

I Hear You Knockin’ by Dave Edmunds – ***

First released: 2000

A live version by Dave Edmunds appears on 2000’s "The Anthology…So Far".

I Gotta Be Me by Ringo Starr – **

Unreleased.

Ringo sings with Sammy Davis, Jr. (Billy Crystal) when he hosted "Saturday Night Live" in 1984.

I Got Up by Linda McCartney – **

First released: 1998

Linda McCartney recording dating from 1973 that eventually appeared on her "Wide Prairie" album.

I Got to Find My Baby by The Beatles – ***

First released: 1994

A 1963 radio version by The Beatles of this 1960 Chuck Berry release appears on 1994's "Live at the BBC".

I Got Stung by Paul McCartney – ***

First released: 1999

McCartney’s rendition of the old Elvis tune for his second collection of oldies "Run Devil Run". It’s very different vocally than the Elvis version, but rocks out more instrumentally than the Elvis version and would have made for a fine single, had McCartney not focused on his own original compositions for single release.

I Got a Woman by The Beatles – ***

First released: 1994

The Beatles perform this 1955 Ray Charles hit in 1963 that appears on "Live at the BBC".

Saturday, April 10, 2010

I Found Out by John Lennon – ****

First released: 1970

From "John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band" comes yet another autobiographical tune about John’s self-realization about certain things in life. Great stuff! It’s also on 1990’s "Lennon" and "The U.S. vs. John Lennon" from 2006. A demo version appears on 1998’s "The John Lennon Anthology" and "Wonsaponatime".

I Forgot to Remember to Forget by The Beatles – **

First released: 1994

A 1964 radio version of this Elvis hit performed by The Beatles appears on 1994's "Live at the BBC".

I Feel Free by Jack Bruce – ***

First released: 2000

A live version by Jack Bruce appears on 2000’s "The Anthology…So Far". Originally, it was recorded by Cream.

I Feel Fine by The Beatles – ****

First released: 1964

For those who thought at the beginning of 1964 that The Beatles couldn't continue to grow need just listen to the feedback portion of this song to show that early on, The Beatles were here to stay! Later it appeared on 1973's "1962-1966". It first appeared on CD on "Past Masters, Volume One" in 1988. It's also on 2000's "1". A live version appears on "Anthology 2" in 1996. A 1964 radio version appears on 1994's "Live at the BBC".

I Don’t Want to Spoil the Party by The Beatles – **

First released: 1964

This is kind of a silly song lyrically especially by Lennon standards. It’s not a bad song, but as I said, kind of silly. It’s on "Beatles For Sale" and "Beatles VI".

I Don’t Want to See You Again by The Beatles – **

Unreleased.

Lennon/McCartney song given to Peter & Gordon in 1964. It is unknown whether there is a Beatles version. I haven't heard it. Also known as "I Don't Wanna See You Again".

I Don’t Want to Do It by George Harrison – ***

First released: 1985

When it seemed that 1982’s "Gone Troppo" album was to be the last ever recordings by George Harrison, it made it all the more shocking to see this Bob Dylan-penned song released three years later as part of the "Porky’s Revenge" soundtrack. It was also released as a single in a slightly different mix. Maybe George wasn’t retiring after all. Two years later, the answer would be revealed with "Cloud Nine". The song has its origins from the "All Things Must Pass" sessions from 1970. It was finally included on a "George Harrison" album with 2009’s "Let it Roll – Songs by George Harrison".

Friday, April 9, 2010

I Don’t Want to Be a Soldier Mama by John Lennon – **

First released: 1971

Borrrring!! Too bad though because it appears on the otherwise absolutely flawless "Imagine" album by John Lennon. When the "Lennon" 4 CD box set was released years later this was the only track from "Imagine" left off. It is also on "The U.S. vs. John Lennon" from 2006. A remixed version is on the import only "Peace, Love & Truth" from 2005. There’s also a demo version released on 1998’s "The John Lennon Anthology".

I Don’t Wanna Face It by John Lennon – **

First released: 1984

Like "I’m Stepping Out", this Lennon song seems like an early take that would have been more polished if circumstances were different, as Lennon is prone to jabbering a bunch of stuff instead of singing, implying that he was still working out the lyrics. From John and Yoko’s "Milk and Honey". Later, on 1990’s "Lennon". A remixed version is on the import only "Peace, Love & Truth" from 2005. A demo version appears on 1998’s "The John Lennon Anthology" and "Wonsaponatime".

I Don’t Need No Cigarette, Boy by The Beatles – **

Unreleased.

Unreleased Lennon/McCartney instrumental dating from the 1960 home recordings.

I Don’t Know by The Beatles – **

Unreleased.

Unreleased Lennon/McCartney instrumental dating from the 1960 home recordings.

I Don’t Care Anymore by George Harrison – **

First released: 1974

This was the b-side to the "Dark Horse" single. If you listen to it, George even tells you that. He says, “We’ve got to make a b-side here.” Nothing remarkable; in fact, it’s pretty bad and George’s voice is at its absolute worst. BUT, it still has never been officially released to any album or CD. Methinks it will be when the "Dark Horse" collection is remastered.

I Don’t Believe You by Ringo Starr – ****

First released: 1992

Personally, I would have chosen this song over "Don’t Go Where the Road Don’t Go" as the second single off of Ringo’s "Time Takes Time" album, but at least it’s here. It sounds a little bit like Jellyfish’s "That is Why", and no wonder as Jellyfish’s Andy Sturmer and Roger Manning wrote and appeared on the track. It also has a great "Help!"-like ending.

I Do Like to Be Beside the Seaside by The Beatles – **

Unreleased.

The Beatles perform a bit of this on the Blackpool show during their 1965 tour.

Thursday, April 8, 2010

I Do by Paul McCartney – **

First released: 2001

Well I don't! Sorry, it was too easy. Admittedly, this is kind of bland from Paul on his "Driving Rain" album.

I Dig Love by George Harrison – ***

First released: 1970

A simple but catchy and funky tune from "All Things Must Pass". Not too deep in the lyrics department, however. I guess that was the point. The chugging beat is what saves this from oblivion.

I Can’t Tell You Why by Timothy B. Schmit – ***

First released: 1993

A live version of the Eagles hit by Timothy B. Schmit appears on "Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band Volume 2 Live From Montreux" in 1993 (this version reissued on 2000’s "The Anthology…So Far").

I Can’t Imagine by Paul McCartney – **

First released: 1993

Another b-side from the "Off the Ground" single "C'mon People".

(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction by The Beatles – ***

Unreleased.

The Beatles ran through a version of this 1965 Rolling Stones classic during the 1969 "Get Back" sessions.

I Can Help by Ringo Starr – **

Unreleased.

One of those Chips Moman produced tunes that Ringo thought he was too drunk while singing. It’s not that bad. I’m not a big fan of the Billy Swan version of this song anyway, so it couldn’t be much worse. It was recorded in 1987.

I Call Your Name by The Beatles – ***; by Ringo Starr - ***

First released: 1965

Originally on a UK EP, this Lennon original is fine indeed. It first appeared on CD on "Past Masters, Volume One" in 1988. In America, this appeared on the "The Beatles' Second Album".

Ringo later did a version of this for a Lennon tribute concert. That version hasn’t been officially released to CD to date.

Wednesday, April 7, 2010

I Bought a Picasso by The Beatles – **

Unreleased.

Nonsense title given to a McCartney/Starkey composition from the 1969 "Get Back" sessions.

I Am Your Singer by Paul McCartney – ***

First released: 1971

Gee, I can't think of any lyrics. Well gosh, I'm singing a song, so "I am your singer"! Brilliance! Paul's doing well on "Wild Life". Not a bad tune, though.

I Am the Walrus by The Beatles – *****

First released: 1967

Truly a Beatles masterpiece! One of the best songs ever recorded by this group or otherwise. It also has a nifty video in "Magical Mystery Tour". It is featured on the album, the EP and the b-side of "Hello Goodbye", "1967-1970", and a slightly different version was released on the US "Rarities" album in 1980. A demo version appears on 1996's "Anthology 2". It is also used for 2006's "Love".

I can't say enough good things about this song. So many people paid tribute to this song over the years with its structure, most notoriously "Sowing the Seeds of Love" by Tears For Fears.

If I could give this five stars, I would…hey, I did!

I Am Missing You by Ravi Shankar – ***

First released: 1974

George’s attempt to make Ravi Shankar marketable to mass audiences. It’s actually quite catchy, but the singing is quite whiny.

Hushabye Hushabye by John Lennon – *

First released: 1968

Jokey title given by John and Yoko on their "Unfinished Music No. 1 – Two Virgins" release as there is no way to distinguish this from the other “tracks” on the record.

Husbands and Wives by Ringo Starr – **

First released: 1974

One of the weaker moments from Ringo’s "Goodnight Vienna" album composed by Miller. Actually, it’s not that bad coming in between more high-energy tracks like "Oo-Wee" and "Snookeroo".

Hurdy Gurdy Man by The Beatles – **

Unreleased.

The Beatles and in particular George made an attempt at singing Donovan’s hit in 1968.

Tuesday, April 6, 2010

Black Dog Blues by The Beatles – ***

Unreleased.

The Beatles record this as part of a hodge-podge of oldies from the 1969 "Get Back" sessions.

Hunting Scene, The by Ringo Starr – **

First released: 1969

Track from "The Magic Christian" soundtrack featuring snatches of dialogue by Ringo.

Hungry Eyes by Eric Carmen – ***

First released: 2000

A live version by Eric Carmen appears on 2000’s "The Anthology…So Far".

Hully Gully not by The Beatles – **

First released: 1977

The Beatles don't perform it live on "Live at the Star-Club, Hamburg 1962" in 1977. Actually, Cliff Bennett and the Rebel Rousers does. It’s still pretty good, however.

Howling at the Moon by John Lennon – (NR)

Unreleased.

Unreleased demo from Lennon dating from 1980.

However Absurd by Paul McCartney – ***

First released: 1986

Original album closer to the vinyl version of "Press to Play" with some more clever wordplay than usual coming from Paul.

How the Web Was Woven by Jackie Lomax – **

First released: 1969

George produces and plays on this Jackie Lomax tune from "Is This What You Want?"

How Many People by Paul McCartney – **

First released: 1989

Paul wrote this message song that seems to be more at home on "Off the Ground". As it turns out, it ended up on "Flowers in the Dirt".

Monday, April 5, 2010

How Long Can Disco On by Harry Nilsson – ***

First released: 1980

Silly disco parody written by Ringo and Harry Nilsson, from Harry’s album "Flash Harry".

How Long by Paul Carrack – ***

First released: 2003

A live version by Paul Carrack also appears on 2004’s "Tour 2003". The song was originally by Carrack’s band Ace from 1975.

How Kind of You by Paul McCartney – *

First released: 2005

Dull, dull, dull, from Paul's "Chaos and Creation in the Back Yard".

"How I Won the War" (feature) by John Lennon – **

First released: 1967

This was going to be released onto DVD sometime in 2002 and I was all excited that I was going to able to see it. I know it came out on tape in 2000, but that’s not the point. I really don’t care to see John Lennon shot, even in a fictional setting. Someday I’ll see it, but I ain’t payin’ no $130 to see it.

Update: Since I first wrote this, the local PBS station KQED played it, and I was all excited to watch, but got bored with it after the first hour or so, and actually switched it off. I have since revised my opinion about Richard Lester as a director to the negative. Although Lester had a couple of good films ("A Hard Day’s Night", "Three Musketeers" (1973 version)), he’s had an awful lot of dogs ("Superman III").

How I Won the War by John Lennon – **

First released: 1967

Not really a Beatles track, but instrumental music by Ken Thorne, which has featured Lennon, dialogue from the film.

How Do You Sleep? by John Lennon – ****

First released: 1971

Lennon’s scathing attack on McCartney from "Imagine" is as appropriate today as it was in 1971, because McCartney has written an awful lot of crap. If he decreased his output to the level of Lennon’s in the same time period and concentrated on perfecting it, Lennon may never have written a song like this. It’s also on 1990’s "Lennon". The instrumental score for this song was first released on "The U.S. vs. John Lennon" in 2006. A demo version appears on 1998’s "The John Lennon Anthology" and "Wonsaponatime".

How Do You Do It? by The Beatles – ***

First released: 1995

Recorded in 1962, The Beatles shelved this one in order to record more originals for their singles. What's interesting is that they didn't even consider this one for an album track, even when EMI was pressuring them for more tunes in America. After being considered for the aborted 1985 "Sessions" release and released on numerous bootlegs, it was finally officially released on "Anthology 1". It's not that bad and very similar to the Gerry and the Pacemakers hit version.

Sunday, April 4, 2010

How Do You Do by Mary Hopkin – ***

First released: 1969

Paul produced a version of this song for Mary Hopkin from her "Post Card" album.

How? by John Lennon – ****

First released: 1971

Lennon sure asks a lot of questions on "Imagine" from "How Do You Sleep?" to this song. He concludes with a statement on "Oh Yoko"! It’s also on the "Imagine: John Lennon" soundtrack from 1988 and 1990’s "Lennon".

House of Wax by Paul McCartney – ***

First released: 2007

Another winner from Paul's "Memory Almost Full". A live version performed at Amoeba Records was released as the b-side of the "Ever Present Past" single. Another live version appears on the "Memory Almost Full Deluxe Edition" from 2007.

House of the Rising Sun, The by The Beatles – ***

Unreleased.

The Beatles perform a version of this traditional tune popularized by The Animals during their 1969 "Get Back" sessions.

Hound Dog by John Lennon – ****

First released: 1986

Lennon performed this Elvis Presley classic from 1956 live in 1972 and this version was released in 1986 on "Live in New York City". This version was also on 1990’s "Lennon" and "Instant Karma" from 2001.

Hottest Gong in Town by George Harrison – ***

First released: 1986

The only "Shanghai Surprise" song that’s still in limbo, unless you listen to it on the film’s soundtrack. Most of the other songs ended up on George’s "Cloud Nine", this one didn’t. Time for a box set! It was given a limited release in 1992 with the second volume of the "Songs By George Harrison" book.

Hotel in Benidorm (Soundcheck) by Paul McCartney – **

First released: 1993

Paul performs a soundcheck version for 1993’s "Paul is Live". It’s ok, for an off-the-cuff type of song.

Saturday, April 3, 2010

Hot As Sun by Paul McCartney – ***

First released: 1970

Another instrumental from "McCartney", this one coupled with "Glasses".

Horse to the Water by George Harrison – ****

First released: 2001

Apparently, the very last song that George Harrison recorded in his lifetime. It should have been included on the upcoming "Brainwashed" set, but instead it is hidden on a somewhat obscure Jools Holland album. Vocalist Sam Brown sang a solid rendition of the song at the "Concert for George" tribute show, giving a wider exposure to an otherwise neglected tune.

Hopeless by Ringo Starr – ***

First released: 1983

Surely as astute commentary on the state of both Joe Walsh’s and Ringo Starr’s careers by this time from Ringo’s "Old Wave" album. The song was also included on "Starr Struck: Best of Ringo Starr, Vol. 2" in 1989.

Hope of Deliverance by Paul McCartney – ****

First released: 1993

Solid choice for a first single from "Off The Ground". Unfortunately, singles had gone by the wayside by 1993 and this song hovered at the wrong end of the singles charts. Paul performs a live version for 1993’s "Paul is Live". Later, two techno remix versions called "Deliverance" were created and issued in limited numbers. While interesting, it barely is connected with the original song except for the sample of Paul saying "Hope" many times and finally "of Deliverance".

Honorary Consul, The by Paul McCartney – ***

First released: 1983

Song composed by Paul for the "Beyond the Limit" soundtrack. John Williams performed it for the soundtrack.

Hong Kong Blues by George Harrison – ***

First released: 1981

The second Hoagy Carmichael song included in George’s "Somewhere in England". The other being "Baltimore Oriole". As time went on, George seemed to like to include covers of old 30s and 40s records on his later albums. Nothing wrong with that, just interesting. I have to admit a lot of times, this was my introduction to a lot of these older songs that George was very fond of in his childhood.

Honeymoon Song, The by The Beatles – ***

First released: 1994

The Beatles recorded a version of this song from the film "Honeymoon" in 1963 that appears on 1994's "Live at the BBC".

Friday, April 2, 2010

Honey Pie by The Beatles – ***

First released: 1968

This wasn't the first time that Paul gave a nod to non-rock and roll types of music on an album. Witness "When I'm 64" from "Sgt. Pepper" or "Your Mother Should Know" from "Magical Mystery Tour". This one is from the "White Album". A demo version is included on "Anthology 3" in 1996.

Honey Hush by Paul McCartney – ***

First released: 1999

Paul does a decent cover of this tune originally written and recorded by Big Joe Turner and later Johnny Burnette. It turns up on "Run Devil Run".

Honey Don’t by Ringo Starr – ***

First released: 1964

Originally Lennon was the featured singer of this Carl Perkins tune, but when The Beatles were fishing for something for Ringo to sing live besides just "Boys", the vocals were handed over. The original studio version with Ringo is on "Beatles For Sale". A 1963 radio version appears on 1994's "Live at the BBC".

A live version appears on 1990’s "Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band" (this version reissued on 2000’s "The Anthology…So Far"), 2004’s "Tour 2003", "Live 2006" album from 2008, and Ringo plays with Perkins himself on 1985's "Blue Suede Shoes: A Rockabilly Session".

Homeward Bound by George Harrison – ***

First released: 1976

George performed this Paul Simon classic with Simon on a 1976 episode of "Saturday Night Live". It was officially released to disc on the "Romanian Angel Appeal" album in 1990 and in 2007, the video performance was released on DVD on "Saturday Night Live, The Complete Second Season".

Holiday I.D. by George Harrison – ***

First released: 1963

Generic title used for various Beatles Christmas recordings dating as far back as 1963. Also, George recorded a little something with a title similar to this for the promotional only album "Winter Warnerland".

Holdup, The by George Harrison – (NR)

First released: 1971

George first played this song with David Bromberg on "The David Frost Show" in 1971.

Hold Your Head Up by Rod Argent – ****

First released: 2008

Rod Argent song from Ringo’s "Live 2006" album from 2008. A great, classic rock anthem.

Thursday, April 1, 2010

Hold On by John Lennon – ****

First released: 1970

Not to be confused with Ringo’s track with the same title released in 1973. Lennon’s "Hold On" is a purely autobiographical tune that is considered a classic and justifiably so from "John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band". It’s also on 1990’s "Lennon". A remixed version is on the import only "Peace, Love & Truth" from 2005. The demo fragment from 1998’s "The John Lennon Anthology" also appears on 2006’s "Remember".

Hold Me Tight by Paul McCartney – **

First released: 1973

I guess Paul forgot that he wrote a tune with this very same title a decade before. The former is superior than this latter filler tune from "Red Rose Speedway" that basically takes the title lyric and repeats it over and over and over with other “great” rhyming lyrics like “hugga me right”!

Hold Me Tight by The Beatles – ***

First released: 1963

A great little rockin’ tune. My favorite part is the “it’s you…you, you, you” part. It is included on the "With The Beatles" album.

Hitch Hike by The Beatles – ***

Unreleased.

The Beatles perform a version of this Marvin Gaye classic during their 1969 "Get Back" sessions.

His Name is Legs (Ladies and Gentleman) by George Harrison – ****

First released: 1975

Another highlight of the "Extra Texture" album. “Legs” Larry Smith was/is best-known as the drummer for The Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band, who also appeared in The Beatles’ "Magical Mystery Tour" film. Strangely, Smith does not play drums on this track, but instead provides two or three distinctly different rap vocals that take repeated listens to make out what he’s actually saying. George duly sings throughout to great effect.

Hippy Hippy Shake, The by The Beatles – ***

First released: 1977

The Beatles performed it live on "Live at the Star-Club, Hamburg 1962" in 1977. A 1963 radio version appears on 1994's "Live at the BBC". Paul sings his heart out.

Highway by Paul McCartney – ***

First Released: 2008

A decent uptempo rocker released by Paul and Youth as Fireman that appears on "Electric Arguments". A superior live version appears on 2009’s "Good Evening New York City".